RSS Feed

Tag Archives: zombies

Moving Slow on Monstrous Monday

Nobody does! Oh, I suppose YOU do (you know who you are).

I haven’t used this charming gentleman in a while, but he seemed appropriate.  It was a grisly hot day in the Mohawk Valley today.  Really, there were all kinds of warnings on the news about how we should stay hydrated and get our exercising done early in the morning.  I worked too early to run, so I just didn’t bother; judge me if you must.  The sad thing about that is that, quite abruptly, running has gotten fun again.  As I watched the afternoon drag by, I was sorry I was not going to run.  I looked forward to running on Tuesday, when temperatures are supposed to moderate somewhat.

Safety first! Walk, don’t run!

As I was looking through my Media Library for a picture of a monster running (which I don’t think I have anyways), I saw the above, which I believe I have not used recently. It is, of course, from Night of the Living Dead (1968), back in the days when zombies did not run but lumbered threateningly and people for some reason were often unable to get away.  I understand zombies move faster these days.  I have not see a recent zombie movie.  I don’t much like horror movies after the late ’60s.  They got too slashy for me.  There are, of course, exceptions.  Some newer movies are more atmospheric and psychological, and there are a few I like even if they did go through a tanker truck of fake blood.

“Who were you expecting, the Avon Lady?”

Thinking of blood, I close with my favorite blood-sucker, Nosferatu.  I’m calling this a Monstrous Monday post, or did you figure that out already?  Longtime readers may recall that I wilt and become quite useless in the heat.  I am brain dead.  Perhaps I am a zombie.  Today I am the lumbering kind, but tomorrow I hope to run.

 

Advertisements

Feeling Like a…

Tired Tuesday apparently has nothing on Wuss-out Wednesday.  I just napped on the couch while waiting for my husband, Steven, to get home.  Now I’m ready for bed.  Well, I won’t go to bed; I will make my blog post.  Maybe I should take a walk to wake myself up.  Maybe my husband would walk with me.  Then he could say…

See what I did there?

Full disclosure:  I don’t know anything about this movie.  I the poster on Facebook when I was trying to psyche myself up to make my post and said, “Heeey!”  I’ve talked about zombies in this space before.  However, I am too zombified myself right now to compose a learned essay, comparing and contrasting the historical etc.  But I can post a few pictures and type a little nonsense.  Let’s go with that.

I don’t think I could be the sort of zombie that runs. I’m more of the gruesome lumbering sort.

It’s a little late to plug something that is happening tomorrow, but this is being held in Little Falls, NY, Oct. 19, as part of the Oktoberfest 3rd Thursday celebration.  Perhaps next year I could participate.  I’ll write a blog post about it if I do.   For more information about it, you can visit the Facebook event.

Several events are happening in that Oktoberfest.  As I often say, Little Falls has got it going on.  Full disclosure:  I will probably not participate in any of the events.  However, if you are not reading this too late, and you live close enough and are so inclined, I encourage you to check it out.  They also have a Facebook event.

I guess he’s more of a ghoul than a zombie, but I’m no expert on these things.

I wanted to include three pictures, so I found this one in my Media Library.  I did not remember using it before, but isn’t it cool?  I love Halloween.  Happy Wednesday, everyone.

 

Zombie Posts for Tired Tuesday

I took a decongestant yesterday evening before rehearsal, because I was tired of breathing through my mouth.  It seemed to help.  It was a 12-hour tablet, so I took another one this morning, after twelve hours had passed.  I have not seen my brain since.

Although I felt dizzy and vague, I did not feel I was a danger to myself and others, so I stayed at work, managing to get a modicum of stuff done.  I felt worse as the day wore on.  Toward the end of the day, I was walking to the bathroom wondering why everyone could not see the intense fog which surrounded me.  Can’t they tell I’m a zombie, I wondered.  Then I realized:  I was not a flesh-eating zombie.  I was a plain old ordinary zombie.  That kind is probably not as noticeable, and if people did notice, why should they care?  I probably would not bother them, and, indeed, I did not.

As you may have guessed, this is a Tired Tuesday post.  I wonder if I could find a few pictures of zombies to pep things up a little.

A little too much salt?

These are actually not zombies, but they are my two favorite characters in King of the Zombies (1941).  I believe I wrote a blog post about it.

Full disclosure: I barely remember this movie.

Another zombie flick I wrote a blog post about was Revolt of the Zombies (1936).  When looking for an image for this movie, I learned a fun fact:  the eyes that are occasionally superimposed on the screen are Bela Lugosi’s from White Zombie (1932).   As it happens, I also wrote a blog post about that movie.

Bela Lugosi: there could be no possible objection.

So I’ve shared a few pictures and plugged myself three times.  I say not bad for a Tired Tuesday.

 

 

Sad Monsters on Tired Tuesday

I think I have used this in two previous blog posts. Don’t judge me.

Do you suppose I can get away with another post of monster movie pictures with silly comments?  I am going to try.  I felt all day that I was Trudging Through Tuesday (I once wrote a blog post of that title).  Well, at least a trudge can result in some forward movement, and I hope not only movement towards Friday (oh, don’t get me wrong, I am looking forward to Friday; I just hope to make other sorts of progress as well).

Where was I?  Ah yes, monster movie pictures.  The above is a repeat but apropos to the day.  I wonder what else I could find…

“Beware… take care!”

Ah, no silly comments on this one.  I share this picture my husband Steven downloaded to mark a sad recent event, the death of Martin Landau, who won a much deserved Oscar for his portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood.   Steven and I LOVE the movie Ed Wood, and we especially enjoy Landau’s character.  In other sad news, George Romero, director of Night of the Living Dead, also died this week.  We have this movie on VHS but do not watch it as often as we do other horror classics.  I suspect Steven does not appreciate creepy movies as much as I do.

I personally prefer the old-fashioned lumbering zombies to the new-fangled faster ones (full disclosure: I’ve never gotten beyond the trailers for the newer zombie flicks).

I thought a movie picture would be more in keeping with the theme than one of Romero himself.  I hope that as a director he would appreciate this in the spirit in which it is intended.

So this is my Tired Tuesday post.  In my defense, the Mohawk Valley weather has taken a turn for the hot and humid. My meager brain has melted into a puddle, and I am only good for doing puzzles on breaks at work (and not very good at those, I confess).  But I hope you will stay tuned.  Soon this blog may go All Tempest All The Time.

 

Late Post, But Here Are Some Zombie Pictures

I am late making my Wuss-out Wednesday post (yes, I really wussed out this time).  Never mind why.  It’s a long story and makes me look bad. Instead, how about a few pictures of zombies, as suggested in comments of a recent post.  I don’t watch as many zombie movies as I do vampire movies.  However, one must acknowledge zombies as the scary monsters they are.

So that’s what happened to Veronica Lake.

I believe this is from Night of the Living Dead, which we have on DVD but rarely watch.  I find it more creepy than scary, and a little sad, especially at the end.  Still, it is considered a classic, so I pop it in when I can talk Steven into it.

I feel a little like this, only without the bright eyes. I do not feel particularly bright these days.

I found this in my search for zombie pictures, and to me it is apropos.  Of course, I believe in making Halloween last all year long.  In fact, I just set my DVR to record several scary movies on TCM, including the delightfully creepy Mad Love, starring Peter Lorre, whose horror credentials are impeccable.  Another find on my search took me in different direction.

I guess I can’t stop running after all.

I must confess, I have not gone running since the Boilermaker.  At first I felt too tired, then it got too hot.  I suppose these are lousy excuses (as most excuses are, but, hey, I’m only human) (and not an un-dead one at that).  I think I must begin running again, though, with a thought to taking part in a Zombie Run in November.  That sounds like fun.

 

An Unusual Voodoo/Witchcraft Kind of Guy

I’ve become suspicious of zombie movies, because the word “zombie” seems to cover such a wide fictional territory. Are they undead or just hypnotized? Flesh-eating or hate salt? Fast or slow? Body parts rotting or intact? There are many kinds of zombies.

Doubts aside, I DVR’d Plague of the Zombies (1966) from TCM in October. I ended up being glad I did. For one thing, it is a Hammer Film. I’m kind of a latecomer to the Hammer party, but I am a fan.

Spoiler Alert! I’m going to give away what seems to me important stuff, not just which kind of zombies these are. You might like to see the movie before reading this, if like me you like to be surprised.

The movie opens on some kind of voodoo ceremony. I don’t think the writers of horror movies research these things very well. I think they just put some half-naked Africans beating on drums and throw in whatever creepy stuff occurs to them at the time. In this case, it is a guy in a mask with a little doll (presumably a voodoo doll) and a vial of blood.

The voodoo doll is obviously female. Flash to a lovely woman sleeping restlessly. When mask guy starts chanting something weird, so does she. We see that her wrist is bandaged (and remember it later, of course). Suddenly she sits bolt upright and screams. End of prologue.

Next we meet a distinguished white-haired doctor and his beautiful blond daughter. They are going to Cornwall or the moors or someplace to help another doctor, who married an old schoolfriend of the daughter, investigate some mysterious deaths.

As the carriage rolls across the countryside, they see a fox, who is shortly followed by five guys in red coats on horses. What, no dogs? I don’t know much about fox hunting, but I thought there were always dogs. Anyways, the young bloods (I know that’s what they are, because that is how they are listed in the end credits) ask if anybody has seen a fox. Beautiful Daughter sweetly misdirects them.

Then it is on to the village, where a funeral is in progress. As Father and Daughter discreetly wait for the cortege to pass, the Young Bloods come thundering back and knock the coffin over a bridge. This makes for a nice creepy shot of the dead body.

The Young Bloods are mad at Daughter for misdirecting them. The brother of the dead guy is mad at both of them. I guess he blames them for the Young Bloods’ intrusion, which I personally thought a little unreasonable. Oh well, he is grief stricken.

It seems that twelve people have died. The families in this backward area will not allow autopsies, giving Distinguished Dad Doctor and Young Doctor a chance for some grave digging (“Could be worse; could be raining”) (oh wait, wrong movie).

We don’t have to wait too awful long to see the zombies, and they are scary. I was particularly fascinated by the motivations of the head bad guy, the leader of the voodoo/witchcraft kind of cult. He uses evil means to kill people and make them zombies, then utilizes them for a sound economic reason. He is also interested in beautiful young women for blood sacrifice purposes (less unusual in these pictures).

I kind of wish they had made more of the economic side of things, because that struck me as something different for a voodoo/witchcraft kind of bad guy. Any number of movie bad guys want to hypnotize beautiful young women for blood sacrifice purposes. However, zombie-izing young men to staff a haunted tin mine is a bit of entrepreneurialism that commands my respect.

Then again, I am a recently converted horror movie aficionado. Economics could play a time-honored role in zombie movies and I just haven’t seen enough of them. Obviously I have more movie watching to do.

In any case, I found Plague of the Zombies a delight. The dramatic conclusion is very satisfying, and Andre Morell as Distinguished Doctor Dad is an excellent hero. In post-movie commentary, Ben Mankiewicz mentioned that Morell is Watson to Peter Cushing’s Sherlock Holmes in Hound of the Baskervilles. That would be a good movie to see again. Love that Peter Cushing.