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Tag Archives: White Zombie

Zombie Posts for Tired Tuesday

I took a decongestant yesterday evening before rehearsal, because I was tired of breathing through my mouth.  It seemed to help.  It was a 12-hour tablet, so I took another one this morning, after twelve hours had passed.  I have not seen my brain since.

Although I felt dizzy and vague, I did not feel I was a danger to myself and others, so I stayed at work, managing to get a modicum of stuff done.  I felt worse as the day wore on.  Toward the end of the day, I was walking to the bathroom wondering why everyone could not see the intense fog which surrounded me.  Can’t they tell I’m a zombie, I wondered.  Then I realized:  I was not a flesh-eating zombie.  I was a plain old ordinary zombie.  That kind is probably not as noticeable, and if people did notice, why should they care?  I probably would not bother them, and, indeed, I did not.

As you may have guessed, this is a Tired Tuesday post.  I wonder if I could find a few pictures of zombies to pep things up a little.

A little too much salt?

These are actually not zombies, but they are my two favorite characters in King of the Zombies (1941).  I believe I wrote a blog post about it.

Full disclosure: I barely remember this movie.

Another zombie flick I wrote a blog post about was Revolt of the Zombies (1936).  When looking for an image for this movie, I learned a fun fact:  the eyes that are occasionally superimposed on the screen are Bela Lugosi’s from White Zombie (1932).   As it happens, I also wrote a blog post about that movie.

Bela Lugosi: there could be no possible objection.

So I’ve shared a few pictures and plugged myself three times.  I say not bad for a Tired Tuesday.

 

 

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The Zombie Eyes Have It

Spoiler Alert! If you think you might want to see White Zombie (1932) with Bela Lugosi, I would advise you watch it before reading this. I think it is better enjoyed if you’re not thinking, “Oh, this is that part she was telling us about.”

According to Robert Osborne’s pre-movie commentary, White Zombie is believed to be the first movie ever made about zombies. I find it hard to believe there are no silent movies featuring zombies, but I’m not that knowledgeable about silent movies (it’s difficult to crochet or knit during a silent movie, because you have to keep your eyes glued to the screen or you’ll miss something).

First or not, it’s an atmospheric, eerie movie. The zombies are the old-timey slow moving creatures with staring eyes. They don’t eat flesh, but some of them do kill a guy and try to kill a couple of others (I did include a spoiler alert, didn’t I?) (I think it’s a bigger spoiler to let you know they only try to kill someone, don’t you?).

The movie takes place in the West Indies, home of voodoo, zombies and assorted other creepy weirdness, it seems. A Beautiful Girl and a Handsome Young Man (side note: why don’t I just refer to him as a Boy and be symmetrical?) are in a horse drawn carriage (to give you an idea of period) on their way to some rich guy’s house.

At least, I think he’s rich. Yes, my famous lack of attention is once again my undoing. Rich Guy has gotten Handsome Young Man a job back in the states and wants the couple to be married from his house. It soon transpires that he is in love with the girl and is willing to use fair means or foul to make her his.

Enter Bela Lugosi. Ah, but before he does, Rich Guy’s butler warns him to have nothing to do with that sort of person. Well, it wouldn’t be much of a movie if the characters listened to sensible advice, would it?

First Rich Guy tries fair means, by propositioning Beautiful Girl as he escorts her to her marriage ceremony. Anybody still wondering why this guy is alone? Of course it doesn’t work, although she tries to let him down easily in the limited amount of time available to her. So it is on to foul means and the zombie meat of the movie.

The nefarious plot perpetrated by Lugosi involves turning Beautiful Girl into a zombie. It is not clear to me how he does it. Something to do with carving some wax and sticking it into the flame of a streetlight. She falls dead into her new husband’s arms.

Soon she is the glassy-eyed possession of Rich Guy. Well, that’s not the chick he fell in love with. He demands Lugosi turn her back into a person even if it means losing her. I guess he’s not such a bad guy for someone who resorted to foul means to win the girl. But Lugosi will have none of this and is soon tormenting Rich Guy in ways that ought to make anybody sorry for him, even viewers who still consider him a lousy beautiful girl stealer.

Lugosi, as usual, utilizes his scary eyes to good effect. The things that especially struck me in this movie were his wild and wooly eyebrows. I think Count Dracula must have tweezed.

Eventually Handsome Young Man finds help and hurries to the rescue, as you probably figured. But can he rescue her? I guess I can’t spoil everything. This movie is recommended. I’ll look for something cheesier next time.