RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Jack Nicholson

Cheerful Monsters?

I feel I ought not make another whiny Monday post, as some of my Monstrous Monday Posts turn out to be. Yet, I am feeling monstrous. Perhaps I could be monstrous but cheerful.

Looks like a fun bunch to me!

Who could be uncheered by William Castle, Vincent Price, and friends? I could get into watching a Castle/Price collaboration about now. However, I would probably want to go to bed before the end. I am on overtime so get up unreasonably early and get very tired by the end of the day (NOT whining! Merely explaining why I am not watching a movie) (It also explains why this post is turning out to be kind of dumb).

A tense confrontation.

The above is from The Terror, a Roger Corman romp, starring Jack Nicholson and Boris Karloff. I like a Corman/Karloff collaboration, too. Plus, it has the charm of alliteration. Regular readers know I love alliteration.

An even rompier movie.

And here is a Price/Karloff collaboration, with Peter Lorre and Jack Nicholson thrown in for good measure, The Raven. I must get that one on DVD for my collection.

Well, now I am feeling quite cheerful, thinking about these movies I love. Additionally, I am approaching 200 words. Regular readers (I think I still have some) know I call that respectable. At any rate, I made it through another Monstrous Monday. I hope to see you all again on Tired Tuesday, as I fear it will be (not whining now either, just predicting).

Monster Movies, Murder and Mayhem on Monday

I felt very fortunate to have today off, but I must confess I did not make very good use of the day. I got the lawn mowed and made some small progress cleaning up some of the overgrowth on the perimeter. I purchased dirt for my container garden but have not used it yet. Baby steps.

And I watched a couple movies.

Jackie Coogan? No way!

This poster showed up on one of my monster pages on Facebook, and I was like, “Oh, yeah, I’ve seen that!” I had it in one of my cheesy DVD collections (The Best of the Worst), so I popped it in. I had an idea I might do a write-up on it for the blog. Not today, though.

The movie is actually in color.

The Terror was on the same disc as Mesa of Lost Women, so I watched that next. I have written about The Terror more than once. It is a favorite of mine. Love that Roger Corman! Um, he produced and directed. The above picture, of course, shows Jack Nicholson and Boris Karloff.

I started to watch another movie but turned it off to make my blog post. I have some true crime television playing in the background. I just loves me some murder and mayhem. Ooh, just look at all the Ms (or should it be M’s?)! There’s my alliterative headline!

These Are Not Movies to Swoon Over

And once again it’s Wrist to Forehead Sunday, the day I swoon onto a chaise lounge in a dramatic pose, because it’s all Just Too Much For Me To Bear.  Oh, OK, not really.  For one reason, I do not own a chaise lounge.  I did pose with one wrist on my forehead earlier, when I was singing to my husband, “You left me broken hearted! Blue since the day we parted!”  I loves me some ABBA.

Side note:  my husband has never left me broken hearted; I just had that song playing in my head, so I sang it. I do that sort of thing.

I could never get my hair to look like that.

Speaking of leaving somebody broken hearted, that is how Michael Douglas leaves Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction, the movie we are currently watching.  You can be psycho and broken-hearted at the same time, can’t you?

I don’t know who all those girls are, nor yet where the spider web comes in, but it is a cool poster nevertheless.

Our first movie of the day was The Terror, at my request.  I wrote a blog post about it one time.  I had forgotten a lot of the plot.  I was just delighted to hear Boris Karloff’s mellifluous voice. I only wish he had had more lines. He got top billing on the basis of who he was more than the actual size of his part.

I have a hard time getting plants to grow myself.

We followed The Terror up with Little Shop of Horrors, the 1960 Roger Corman flick, not the musical, of which I am not at all fond.  Incidentally, Jack Nicholson does not play the sadistic dentist but a masochistic patient of the dentist.  Just to clear that up.  Jack Nicholson was also in The Terror, so we had a little Jack Nicholson film festival going on.  I would have preferred a Boris Karloff film festival, but he does not get to use his beautiful voice in Frankenstein and we don’t have The Raven.  I must find a DVD of The Raven.

Ah, Raven, someday you will be mine!

So that is my Wrist to Forehead Sunday post about our movie watching day.  I hope to see you all on Mental Meanderings Monday.

 

But What Would Poe Think?

Spoiler Alert! I’m going to tell the plot and I may give away a couple of the best jokes.

I thought The Raven (1963) had it all: Vincent Price, Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre star. Roger Corman directed. And it’s based, or rather “inspired by” Edgar Allen Poe. This movie is going to rock! I thought, as I set my DVR.

Well, the movie does rock, but not quite in the way I expected it to. It starts out creepy enough: the camera pans through a gloomy castle while Price’s inimitable voice intones the poem “The Raven” by Poe. A big, scary black bird appears on cue. When Price dramatically asks will he ever see his dear Lenore again and we are waiting for — come on, you know this — Quote the Raven, “Nevermore!” instead we hear a rather testy Peter Lorre answer, “How should I know?”

And it goes on from there.

It is a very silly movie. Boris Karloff is responsible for Lorre’s feathered state. He is the evil head magician. Price’s father used to be the (not evil) head magician, but Price lives retired with his beautiful daughter and the body of his dead wife.

Lorre’s son is played by Jack Nicholson. I think it is delightful that Nicholson got his start in cheesy horror movies. So far I’ve seen him in Little Shop of Horrors, The Terror and now The Raven. Unfortunately, in The Raven, he is merely a handsome young man and doesn’t get much to do.

The highlight of the picture is the showdown between Karloff and Price. This is a scene they love to show clips of in Price or Corman retrospectives. Price counters Karloff’s zaps with panache and a sweet smile.

I laughed heartily at The Raven and recommend it to lovers of horror with a sense of humor.