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Tag Archives: farmer’s market

Market, Motors and Memory

I went to the Clinton Farmer’s Market today.  What a crowd scene!  I brought my Tablet to take some pictures, but the only real photo op was a display of some vintage cars. The cars reminded me of a previous experience,  so this may turn into a Throw Back Thursday post.

My companions at the market included my sister Cheryl and great-nephew Sheppie.  We were the three who walked across the street to see the cars.  I love classic cars.

I would love to tool down the road in this!

A fellow there showed us the engines of a couple of the cars and explained some of the mechanics involved.  These were Franklin cars, which were apparently the best made at the time.

Cheryl and Sheppie.

The cars reminded me of a time I dressed in 1920’s garb and posed near an old automobile.

This is not exactly like the car in my memory.

I was unable to show my pictures of the other car at the time, but I can show them to my readers now.

Hmmm… not really like it at all.

Here is the car I remembered.   It was parked in front of one of the Rutger Mansions in Utica, NY, for a fundraiser for the Landmarks Society of Greater Utica.  But that isn’t the picture I really wanted to show.

I rarely ignore a chance to flash a little leg.

Yes, this is me, impersonating a society lush from the 1920’s.

My husband Steven and friends Kim and Wayne.

This picture was actually taken a year later than the previous one, but it us the same car.

I guess this also can count as a Non-Sequitur Thursday post,  since I veered from farmers market to memories.  Who says I can’t multitask?

 

I Did NOT Get a Christmas Present!

Today after leaving work, I stopped by the Ilion Farmer’s Market at Clapsaddle Farm on Otsego Street, in Ilion, NY.   I was looking for… well, never mind what I was looking for.  It was NOT a Christmas present.  All I purchased was… never mind.  It’s not important.  It was NOT a Christmas present.

Folk artist Jim Parker, who owns Clapsaddle Farm and runs the farmers’ market, was the only one there.  He said he sent the vendors home, because it was too cold for them.  He was sticking close to the wood stove himself.  I did not take too look with my shopping.

I looked over the display of prints from postcards made by Ellen Clapsaddle many years ago.  I also looked over the Jim Parker prints.  I discovered a new one, of the back of a couple of buildings overlooking the canal.  I know exactly where that building is.  I love it!  I complimented Jim on it.

He said he had enjoyed painting it and there was a story behind it.  He painted the buildings in hopes that somebody would see the picture, get inspired, and restore the buildings.  Both buildings have been purchased and are being fully restored.  Jim confessed that he didn’t know if it was the painting that had inspired it, but…

“It didn’t hurt,” I said.

I love that little farmers’ market, and I love Jim Parkers’ art.  They are open Fridays and Saturdays year round at 437 Otsego St., Rt. 51 South, in Ilion.  For more information, you can visit their Facebook page, Parker’s Historic Cider Mill and Farmers Market.

 

Farmers in Little Falls

Last Saturday I took a drive into Little Falls to check out the Winter Farmers Market on its first weekend for the season.  I checked the Facebook page and noted that it was at 20 Albany St.  Now, regular reader may recall that I am not especially adept at getting around in Little Falls.  Local readers will understand why.  It is a hilly place with lots of one-way streets, some of which do not come out where I expect them to.  However, after a little driving back and forth, I saw the sign for the market in the parking lot of the Travellodge Inn and Suites.

Unfortunately, I did not get a picture of that sign, which might have been nice right there.  In my defense, I had not yet written that paragraph when I was there taking pictures.  Instead, I offer a picture of the Bull Moose Produce sign.

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The Bull Moose people were at the only outside table.  We’ve been having a pretty comfortable week, but Saturday was COLD (yes, it rates capital letters when you take into account that we are not all acclimated yet).

“We’re taking one for the team to let people know we’re here,” the man at the table told me.  I had to appreciate the dedication.  I was delighted to purchase some sweet peppers, their last of the season.

I went inside to find one other vendor, MAWS Farm of Newport.  I did not get a picture of their sign (my bad), but I took two photos of their table:

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I got some enormous onions, one of which I used in a yummy dish I cooked the next day.

The Little Falls Winter Farmers Market runs on the second and fourth Saturday of the month.  I intend to go back next Saturday when I hope there will be more vendors.  In the meantime, here is a brief shout-out with pictures.  For more information, you can visit their Facebook page.

 

We Interrupt this Scattered Saturday to Make a Blog Post

I have been adventuring all afternoon after getting up at 3:30 a.m. and working overtime, with the result that I am too tired to compose a proper blog post (what a surprise, me not making a proper post.  Say it ain’t so!).  I will go with my usual Scattered Saturday method and give a brief overview of what we did.

We headed to Richfield Springs, NY to go to the Richfield Springs Historic Association Museum and Exhibit Hall.   We knew it was located at 134 W. Main St., but you know, Main Street in any town can be long.  We missed it the first time through but noticed a Farmer’s Market going on. We turned around and parked near that.  We figured it was a nice day for a stroll down Main Street in any case.

The Farmer’s Market had some interesting looking vendors.  I would have liked to purchase some cheese or produce, but since  I was not sure how long it would have to stay in my hot car, I refrained.  On down Main Street we went. Richfield Springs is a charming little village.  I pushed the button to get a Walk signal just about the time a fire engine was turning onto Main at that corner.

The fire truck was followed by roughly 8,764 motorcycles (no, I didn’t count them, but I thought that number was closer to the truth than “a bazillion,” which is what I started to type).  It must have been some official ride for something, although I never found out what.  Still, it was fun to see all the motorcycles.  I do love a parade.

When we finally found the museum, it still lacked ten minutes till it opened.  Luckily we had noticed a store a couple of doors down called “Finders Keepers.”  It was easy to kill some time wandering around looking at antiques, collectibles and, well, one man’s trash.  Then we were on to the museum.

I’ll write more about both Finders Keepers and the museum later.  For now I’ll just say we had a great time and both places are definitely worth another visit.  We walked back to the vehicle feeling that if that was all we did, it would not be a bad afternoon’s adventure.  As we reached our vehicle,  I noticed a lady walking down the sidewalk.

“Hey!  That’s Aunt Mary!”  I didn’t mention that my Aunt Mary and Uncle Ted live in Richfield Springs, but they do.  I had gotten their phone number from my mother thinking we might call and stop by at some point.  As it turned out, we would not have had a chance to do so, but Aunt Mary and I had a nice little chat on the sidewalk.

Our adventures continued and included Pail Shop Vineyards, Jerry’s Place, Dyn’s Cider Mill, Rustic Ridge Winery, and a whole lot of driving through windy, hilly country roads.   We had a wonderful afternoon.

And now I’m tired.  I’m having a cup of coffee, which may revive me somewhat.  One might think I could then write a better blog post, but I don’t think this one is contemptible. Or do I flatter myself?  No matter.  I’m over 500 words.  I’m going back to enjoying my weekend with my husband.  Happy Saturday, everyone.

 

The Garlic Pickles

Anyone who knows me knows that garlic is one of the guiding forces of my life. Regular readers of the blog may have noticed that garlic plays a part in nearly all my recipes (after I let it “breathe” for fifteen minutes, of course). Imagine my delight when I found garlic pickles at the Ilion Farmer’s Market last Saturday.

Parker’s Historic Cider Mill and Farmer’s Market on Otsego Street in Ilion, NY is one of Steve’s, Tabby’s and my favorite places to go. Naturally we like any place we can bring our sweet little schnoodle Tabby, and Tabby’s favorite places are those where there are many interesting smells and nice people to pet her.

I know I’ve given many shout-outs to the Ilion Farmer’s Market. It runs year round on Fridays and Saturdays in a barn built in the 1800s. I just never get tired of going there.

On this visit, we particularly noticed works by folk artist Jim Parker, prints, t-shirts, mugs and note cards. I have a t-shirt of a print of Ilion but I’ve had it for a while and I recently noticed some discoloration along the collar. I informed Steven I will be needing a new shirt, perhaps with a different print. Do you suppose he’ll make my wait for my birthday?

Allowing Tabby time to sniff and be petted, we made our way to the shelves at the end of the barn where I always check the canned (jarred?) goods for garlic pickles. A long time ago, I found some garlic pickles there and loved them. I have not seen them since.

Until last Saturday. Eureka! Hot and Sweet Garlic Pickles! I chose hot, telling Steven I would probably return the following week to purchase sweet.

The pickles are crisp, tasty and hot. I think they would be very good in a sandwich or salad. So far I’ve eaten them plain and in a bologna-cheese roll-up. Yum!

My only fear now is that local readers will all dash to the Farmer’s Market and buy up all the garlic pickles, leaving none for me. Oh well, if such a thing happens, at least I will have spread joy and happiness.

Not Overboard Yet

Today’s post actually took place before yesterday’s post. At first I felt a little silly about that and wondered if I shouldn’t have made it all one big post. Then I remembered it is Non-Sequitur Thursday. Perfect! On with the post!

Saturday Steven got out of work early enough to do something fun. I had seen in the paper that Ilion Farmer’s Market was selling flowers and herbs, which I wanted for my container garden. Tabby is welcome at the Farmer’s Market. Our plan was set.

We got there around three. Right away we saw the small display of plants, but first we went into the barn to browse. A few of the vendors had changed, but the historic barn’s atmosphere was still warm and welcoming. Tabby found all kinds of interesting places to sniff, and a few people petted her. I did not let her go near the cafe. I may have to come by without Tabby sometime and enjoy a little of that good food.

Back out at the plant table we chose basil, dill and two different flowers. I don’t know what they’re called (have I mentioned today that this is not a real gardening blog?), but the big blooms were red, pink and white while the little blooms were purple. The herbs looked very healthy. I sure hope I can keep them that way.

Jim Parker, the folk artist who runs the Farmers Market, told us they would be getting in more plants. I said I might be back next week. I’ll try not to go overboard (as I said yesterday I tend to do with my container garden), but what’s wrong with leaning out a little over the rail?

Sunday we decided to supplement our Farmers Market purchases with a trip to T & J’s Fruits and Vegetables in Herkimer. I’ve stopped there for produce many times, most recently finding a wonderful hyacinth for my mother’s Easter present. I had noticed their greenhouse was full. All kinds of choices. They even had the leaves that grow straight up (I’m not describing them very well, but perhaps you know what I mean).

“That’s what you need for containers,” I told Steven. “You want the thrill, the fill and the spill.” I said it with gestures, demonstrating the contribution of each “ill.” I did not purchase any thrill, but I found some fill and spill. The fill included marigolds, and the spill some little yellow flowers I of course do not know the name of (some of you are probably surprised I recognized the marigolds).

As I said, I haven’t gone overboard yet. But it’s early days. We’ll see what the weekend brings.

Cheese Before Wine

Steven and I began our Friday Mohawk Valley adventures with a trip to Vintage Spirits in Herkimer, NY for a wine and cheese tasting. I was delighted to see that Three Village Cheeses was providing the cheese.

The wine tasting table seemed a little crowded, so I started with the cheese. Tom remembered me from last June. He had read my blog post from that tasting, so that established cordial relations right away.

I tried the feta first and immediately declared it my favorite. So smooth, so deep. I don’t know how people usually describe cheeses (notes of… what? I never taste the notes in wine either, so what does that tell you), but I thought the feta was substantial. The other heavy one was the tomme, which I think I declared my favorite last time. I like the ones that are more complex.

I happily nibbled the mild ones, too, and when I got to the Habanero Havarti (I think habanero should have a tilda over the n, don’t know how to do it on my computer) (point and laugh if you must), I knew I had found my cheese of the day.

I recently bought some store brand pepper jack at Hannaford and found I liked the bite. Well, this was a glorification of that taste. The cheese was cheesier! The pepper was peppier! It was better than yummy!

Having made up my mind on the cheese, I turned my attention to the wine. Of course, as I sipped I returned to nibble. Must experiment with wine/cheese pairings after all.

I believe I can purchase Three Village Cheeses at Ilion Farmer’s Market. If not, I will surely make my way to the cheese factory and retail store at 2608 Newport Rd., Poland, NY. I can get directions via their Facebook page. I think it is time to upgrade from store brand cheese. Sorry, Hannaford!