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Tag Archives: A Christmas Carol

Not a Famous Monstrous Monday

His expression is not as festive as his attire.

Well, why not have a Monstrous Monday on Christmas Eve?  For one reason, I don’t have much else.  I went running this morning, intending to do a Running Commentary.  Steven and I had breakfast at Heidelberg Cafe in Herkimer, NY prior to picking up rolls for tomorrow’s Christmas feast, so I could have done a shout-out to a local business.  Well, sometimes these things do not work out.  Right now I want to get back to celebrating Christmas Eve with my loved ones, so I will attempt to come up with something mildly entertaining at least.

What could be more Monstrous Christmas Eve than Boris Karloff reading “How the Grinch Stole Christmas”?

Here is another Frankenstein/Christmas mash-up: the most famous portrayer of the former reading a classic tale about the latter.  But adding the macabre to Christmas is by no means original to me.  There is even a line in a Christmas song, “There’ll be scary ghost stories…”

Who doesn’t love a ghost at Christmas?

We watched two different versions of A Christmas Carol yesterday and might have watched  a third if I hadn’t pooped out (I only mentioned one in my blog post; do you suppose I should go back and edit?).  It is perhaps the most famous Christmas ghost story.

And now I see that I am over 200 words.  Regular readers know I call that respectable, especially for my more foolish posts.  Happy Christmas Eve and Monstrous Monday, everyone!

 

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The Ghost of Christmas Post?

“I wear the chain I forged in life!”

I like ghosts as much as I like monsters, so A Christmas Carol is one of my favorite Christmas stories.   My husband Steven and I have 14 versions of it, on DVD and VHS.  I just now counted, and it is possible I missed a couple.  It is also possible we will discover another version to add to the collection.  Steven shared the above photo on Facebook today; alas, we do not own that comic book.

As you may have guessed, this is a Tired Tuesday post.  I tried for a Running Commentary and a Mohawk Valley adventure, but I have the type it in, backspace it out disease. I confess,  I almost gave up.  Then I remembered this picture, and it seems to be helping.  I am over 100 words and still typing.

“Glo-o-o-o-o-oo-o-o-o-o-oo-o-o-o-o-oo-ria!”

I don’t think these are actually characters in the book, but don’t they look Dickensian?  I was once writing a stage version of A Christmas Carol, and I had a group of carolers narrate the story.  I wonder if I could get Ilion Little Theatre or LiFT to put it on, if I finished it.  Well, probably if I started it again and finished it, because I rather doubt I could find what I started.  It was in the 1990’s.

“God bless us, every one!”

I used this picture in a recent post, but I thought it fit in with today’s theme.    I see I am over 200 words, so I will call this a post.  Ooh, I’m tired.  I hope to see you all on Wednesday, when I will strive not to Wuss Out.

 

Musings on Magoo

I know I said yesterday that I would plan a better blog post for today, but nobody really got their hopes up, did they? I hope a Midweek Middle-aged Musing will suffice.

The other day Steven and I watched one of our all time favorite Christmas specials: Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol. Like many children in the ’60s (no, not in THEIR 60s, in the years following 1960. Sheesh!), it was our first introduction to the Charles Dickens classic.

The old Mr. Magoo cartoons have fallen into bad repute these days. Some people say they do not find it amusing to make fun of someone’s disability, in this case nearsightedness. This is, of course, a worthy sentiment. If I recall the original cartoons, the joke was that Mr. Magoo was completely oblivious to the fact that he could not see and to all the trouble it got him into. Everything always worked out for him in the end.

That doesn’t make it right to make fun of him, the argument continues. Perhaps not, but consider this: Many vision problems are easily correctable with a pair of glasses, and many people are too cheap, vain or stubborn to provide themselves with glasses. I think cheapness, vanity and stubbornness are OK to make fun of.

Ebenezer Scrooge falls into the cheap category.

“Could I need spectacles?” he asks himself. Then, realizing spectacles cost money: “Must be this gruel. Sour, sour!”

Later the Ghost of Christmas Present: “So you’re the man who’s too tight with a penny to buy himself a pair of spectacles!”

So you see.

If you don’t buy my rationalization, just remind yourself: Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol was made in 1962. We know better now. Use it as a teachable moment and enjoy the show. We did.

And don’t be too cheap to buy yourself a pair of glasses if you need them.