RSS Feed

Monday Mail Meanderings

This is not a Monday Mental Meanderings but a Pedestrian Post.  I walked to the Post Office to mail the post cards I usually send out on Saturday.  I took my Tablet along to take a few pictures, thinking to make a change from my usual Monday Monsters (don’t worry, monster lovers; no doubt I will resort to my frightening friends later in the week).  I thought of this alliterative title as I walked home.

I put the Tablet into a soft bag I got at Paca Gardens in Little Falls (just for a little more local color).  I did not trust myself to carry it the whole way, especially not in its case.  I was only a little worried I would not be able to see the screen properly, because it was quite sunny.  I put my prescription sunglasses in the bag, thinking I might need them.  Not neglecting to also put in the post cards, I set out.

Right away I saw what I considered a cool-looking tree.  I love the look of bare branches against the sky. I got the Tablet out of the bag and tried to log in without the stylus.  That didn’t work, because I was wearing gloves.  So I got out the stylus and promptly dropped in in the snow.  It is a combination pen/stylus given to me by Herkimer County Historical Society after Shattered Angel, the play they put on at Ilion Little Theatre last fall.  It says “Shattered Angel/Ilion Little Theatre” on it (see? more local color!).  It is a very cool thing.  I brushed it off as best as I could, logged into the Tablet, and could not get the picture. I include the story of me trying, because it is just so typical me.  I walked on.

As I approached St. Francis de Sales Church, I thought I would get a shot of the statue of St. Francis wearing a red scarf, as he does this time of year.  I worried it would be back-lit, but it did not turn out too bad.

He looks saintly, does he not?

After I crossed the street, I tried to get a shot of the whole church.  That one turned out too shadowy, so I do not include it here.  I walked on into Meyers Park, where I knew I could take a picture of the statue of General Herkimer.  First, however, I saw the stone bench I have often admired but never sat on.

I was hoping the inscription would be legible.

Beyond the bench is a statue, only I do not know who it is. However, according to the inscription, he was instrumental in having women work for the government. I’m all about good jobs for women!  I was worried I had cut his head off, but I see now that I did not.

It seems they engraved his signature but did not print out the name.

I also got a shot of the pavilion, which is always a pivotal location when the park hosts community events.

It may not look like such a much now, but the potential is there.

I think my picture of General Herkimer is just a little back-lit, but in a blog about a walk in Herkimer, I feel I should include the General.  Here he is, in the iconic pose, directing the battle though morally wounded.

I see he has a similar scarf to St. Francis’.

On the other side of the park, I walked by the Methodist Church and decided to get a shot of that.  It turned out better that the one of St. Francis, so I include it.

Perhaps I should learn how to photoshop out power lines.

I was happy to get a shot of the post office.  I think I had a post card of it but already sent it to someone.  I do love sending local post cards.  In fact, I am not sure if the post card was of this post office or Little Falls’.  They are similar buildings.

My weekly destination. I do love post offices.

I had meant to talk more about the actual walk, over the ice and through the snow.  However, I see I am approaching 700 words.   Do my readers want to read over 700 words on a Monday? I hate to try people’s patience.  Additionally, Dateline is on OWN as I type.  So I say Happy Monday, and stay tuned for monsters later in the week.

 

4 responses »

  1. Mary Vander Voort

    A very interesting offering, Cindy. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  2. The statute of the fella that hired women? Francis Spinner, Secretary of the Treasury.

    “Treasurer Frances E. Spinner took a note from the US Patent Office (which had a few female clerks) when he decided in 1862 to hire Jennie Douglas to trim money. Although we’d like to say she was a Washingtonian born and bred, Ms. Douglas was from New York, Spinner’s own home state. Bills at this time were printed four to a page and individual workers cut them out by hand. Spinner reasoned that women were naturally good with scissors, and only needed to be paid half as much to boot. Spinner was pleased with Douglas’s first day, remarking that she “settled the matter in her behalf and in woman’s favor.”[1]

    With such success, Spinner set about hiring more women to trim money, and more to count the money besides. With fast fingers and a head for numbers, a single clerk counted as many 50,000 bills in a day. Over the course of the war, over 400 women would work for the Treasury department, including in the office of Secretary Salmon P. Chase.”

    https://blogs.weta.org/boundarystones/2016/03/01/first-treasury-girls

    Reply
    • That’s awesome! Thank you for the information. Of course, if I was a really good blogger, I would have found out who the statue was and looked it up myself. And here we come to the ugly truth about me…

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: